Tuesday, January 15, 2008

A trip to the Wisconsin River

So this is a story about going out to the Wisconsin River. Brush up on your geography skills. The river is clearly visible in the SW quadrant of this satellite photo. So brace yourself, it's longer than usual.


















PS: Jean wrote a really beautiful book about living on the river. It is called "To Thank a River." I recommend it highly.

12 comments:

Dr. Monkey Von Monkerstein said...

I loved this story. It was so sweet.

kate said...

What a wonderful time you must have had with Jean. I love your drawings with colour! Jean's book is an interesting read... I started reading the preview and then realised that I hadn't left you a comment.

I hope you aren't going to be under the weather for too long - otherwise I'll have to take to printing out your line drawings and colouring them.That was fun, btw!

Marianne said...

Hi Caroline!
I really enjoyed your depiction of the big city! And I am glad you have an escape out of it too.
Be well!

Suzy said...

Caroline, so much about this post spoke to me (as your work so often does!)The Wisconsin River is an amazing treasure, and much of its shoreline is conservation land. I love crossing the bridge at Spring Green, which looks like it was built from an erector set, and you look down the river and half expect to see dinosaurs standing in the water! It gives me chills!

I also have a memory of my father making a plum pudding with hard sauce one Christmas. He probably made it for his buddies at Student Health, or his tootling friends, so your dad was involved either way. :-) I didn't much care for the pudding, but (and what does this say about me?) I loved the hard sauce!

Ed said...

I love that drawing of the Wisconsin River at Sauk City. The Wisconsin River is one of the coolest places I've ever been, but I rarely get to see it in winter. We really must go canoeing on it next summer. It's amazing that so much of it has been saved from development. As Suzy mentioned, you really half expect to see dinosaurs around any bend. I've yet to see a dinosaur, but there is always an abundance of birds to be seen.

Lana Gramlich said...

Very lovely. I felt like I was sitting with y'all, having tea & birdwatching.
Many people I know feel a strong, personal affinity to water, either in general, or to a specific body. I used to hold the Atlantic particularly dear (having grown up on Long Island, NY.) After having lived within a mile of it for 18 years, Lake Erie now holds special significance for me. It's been a friend, a playmate, a food source, a therapist, a lover. I even brought some of her sand with me when I moved, so I'd never really be far away. Niagara Falls & the Niagara River were also prominent places, but even they can't compare with my beloved Erie...

T.R. said...

I love this story! We should all have Wisconsin Rivers running through our lives. Glad you are back!

Pam said...

What a wonderful, warm story.

I feel like a little kid discovering new, beautifully illustrated books every time I come here. Have I told you how glad I am that you back?

Marlene D. said...

Wonderful story Crayons. She sounds like a good friend. I like all of these, but my favorite is the drawing of the river. Tah-tah.

Selma said...

How tranquil to live by a river as it captures the ebb and flow of the day. This piece was pure magic.

Ginnie said...

Caroline...You are destined to be a book illustrator. Your pictures are so captivating and unique. I love them.

nina said...

Like the drawing of you and Jean watching birds--two people, sitting side-by-side, looking out. Sweet.