Sunday, March 2, 2008

Vocabulary






Do you have a size 44 bustline?

17 comments:

Dr. Monkey Von Monkerstein said...

I knew the French liked us. That's a sweet story my friend. Thanks for telling it.

nina said...

You were fortunate to find such a sweet reception. Perhaps your youth made her feel motherly toward you?

We had an experience quite the opposite. Trying to speak French (because it's suggested you make an attempt) we did our best to order in a little cafe. The waitress was horrible to us--not giving the least help and refusing to speak ANY english with us, although she would to other customers (who hadn't tried to speak!)

mon@rch said...

Awww, you always make me smile with these! Each drawing has all kinds of detail that can be overlooked if you are not paying attention! Thanks my friend!

Terry said...

I love it all but I especially love the Hermes scarf part. I love it when you point to things. I love it when you make sly comments. I don't know how you do that, comment slyly, without actually coming out and saying something. (Sly in the best sense of the word, of course.)

Do you ever get lonesome for France?

The cobblestones made me a little bit lonesome for Germany.

Selma said...

What a charming story. Made me chuckle. I have made similar mistakes when travelling. Sometimes our earnest desire not to make a mistake trips us up. Madame was very kind to you!

Lana Gramlich said...

Ack! Isn't that always the way? Practice makes perfect my rotund behind! *LOL* Thanks for sharing the story!

bobbie said...

I did have to laugh at this one. As always, your wonderfully detailed drawings are amazing. I enjoyed this story so much.

Ginnie said...

You are very brave, Caroline! I am always afraid to use a foreign language where the miss placement of one letter can change the whole meaning. A wonderful post and, per usual, your pictures are a delight.
(PS: I congratulate you on how you handled the "meme" quandry. I wish I had more of your tact.)

Durand said...

Not only do I enjoy the sensitivity to the individuals of your colorful stories, I enjoy perusing the insights offered in each picture. A careful and observant nature you have, thoroughly and compassionately expressed in the way it lingers in the details.

M. Dietrich said...

Crayons Dear,
This is a delight. You add more finesse to your storytelling with each post. Are you adding watercolor to your mix now?

Beth said...

Hi Caroline,

I loved the drawings and the story. I've had lots of similar experiences with Spanish. When my son was a baby, I took him to a Spanish-speaking baby-sitter. One day, I left my purse, and instead of saying, "se me olvido mi cartera," I said, "se me olvido mi carreta (oxcart or wheelbarrow!)." Another day I wanted to tell the babysitter that my son had a runny nose, "tiene mocos," but instead I said, "tiene moscos (he has flies)." And a Spanish teacher at the University used to tell about how she went to a drugstore looking for a bath sponge, but asked for a sponge bath! Language learning can be treacherous!

Beth

SME said...

I adore these drawings and stories!

kate said...

I have made my share of these kinds of mistakes in French - confusing my neck with another part of my anatomy, much to the hilarity of my friends.

Lovely drawings ... I like the green shoes the best.

T.R. said...

First I am chuckling thinking that the French call that gap-toothed grinning kid from The Little Rascals series "Sarrasin" instead of "Buckwheat". Fantastic.

You have a way of narrating to the point that you actually move me out of the drawing and into real life. It's like watching a movie, or being there. I can't explain it. There is always a little magic in a Crayon's post.

Try as I might I cannot get a French person to be rude to me. I butcher the language, I ask questions in English, I do all the things you are not supposed to do and yet they insist on accommodating me and even speaking to me in their best English. They smile wide and giggle when my gag reflex is engaged trying to say the French words for butter and mussels. I don't know what I did wrong. Its some sort of discrimination - I just want to be treated like every other American dammit. Aux revoir les elephants (my favorite French movie)!

Jess Wundrun said...

Ditto what everyone says about your delightful storytelling.

When I was in middle school we had a french student stay with us for one month in the summer. We took him for a drive through southern Wisconsin.

When we said we were going to Prairie du Chien (Prayery doo Sheen) he went apoplectic "Eet ees Pra-REE duh She-ENN. Pra-REE duh She-ENN". To this day, whenever I am in that area I yell out his (correct) French pronunciation. My small in-car audience always giggles.

Mel said...

Nice story! hahaha
I love the drawings and the way you share your thoughts and experiences, it is fun!

Anonymous said...

This is wonderful! I love how you managed to convey all kinds of information with a few details. (Like the look on Madame's face and her crossed arms when she first offers to assist you.)

Of course Madame finally took a liking to you. Anyone who spends just a few moments in your company can't help but love you.