Saturday, April 26, 2008

Passover 2008
























































17 comments:

Peggy said...

This is delightful, as always! Every bit is wonderful, from the cat-petting in the first panel to the wonderful menu in the last.

I am such a fan.

Anonymous said...

Oh my Dios, this came out so good! Sweetie, your drawings are wonderful! I know how much work you put into every one and it really shows.

Your mama and papa would be so proud of you. I know I am!
Boris

Selma said...

The drawing of you sitting among the daffodils is just the best. How nice to have such a rich family heritage.

bobbie said...

Every picture is so detailed. The story itself is marvelous. I envy you the knowledge you have of your heritage. A beautiful job and a delight to the eye.

Anonymous said...

Hi Caroline,

I loved the drawings and the story, just wonderful, as usual! Have you read any of Tariq Ali's novels? In the Shadow of the Pomegranite, set in Al Andalus (Muslim Spain, a time of relative tolerance), or the Stone Woman, which takes place in Turkey during the late nineteenth century, as the Ottoman Empire was coming to a close. Your family story also reminds me of my husband's mother's family, Greek Christians who came to the US from Turkey.

Beth

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for these beautiful drawings and sharing your heritage and your life with us. When I read this one, I thought I would love to see you creating a pictorial history book for children. You could make history come alive for them! You made it come alive for me.
Dona Davis

Sacred Suzie said...

Oh Caroline, how beautiful! What a wonderful way to honour your family and your family's history. Thank you for that journey through time and space so we could see your family history's story. It's quite fascinating!

mon@rch said...

These are such wonderful drawings and I love what you always do! Happy Passover 2008 to you!

MojoMan said...

Hag semeach!

May we all find freedom from that which enslaves us.

joared said...

Liked your story and drawings -- love family tribute. Happy 2008 Passover!

Thank you for "visiting" and your comments.

ellen said...

What a lovely tribute. These are wonderful! I am especially fond of the depiction of your dad in his chair. I, too, love all of the detail in each one.Thank you for sharing this.

Sandpiper said...

This is wonderful! We always enjoyed celebrating the Greek holidays when my husband's parents were alive. It's nice to reach back to our roots and appreciate where we came from, and those customs, whether they are religious or cultural.

(BTW, one of our favorite restaurants here is Turkish - Anatolia.)

Lana Gramlich said...

I LOVE the drawing about Izmir/the Ottoman Empire--just beautiful!
I was raised Jewish, myself (although I don't consider myself Jewish now.) I haven't been to a seder since I was 12, probably (although I still remember how to sing the 4 questions, all these years later!) Living in the highly Christian "bible-belt" of the deep South, Jewish foods usually only appear on store shelves around this time of year, so I take advantage while I can. Last night I finished off the gefilte fish & tonight I'll be enjoying some more matzo. L'chaim.

kate smudges said...

I will remember this history lesson because of its beauty and colour. It was good to learn more about you ... your drawings are so dynamic - what a difference colour makes!

Ed said...

I've always been fascinated by human migration. Why did different groups of people end up where they did? Where did they come from? Your post makes me wonder how and when the Sephardic Jews came to be in Spain. Wasn't Turkey a Muslim country in 1492? If so, it seems interesting in the light of modern history that they welcomed the Sephardic Jews.

Thanks for the thought provoking post and, as always, the wonderful illustrations.

freebird said...

Great post. Thanks for sharing it. I agree you should be doing a book. You are very talented. I should be careful about saying "you should" about your art. My family always tells me I should be making money from mine. They don't realize that as soon as money enters the picture I stress out and stop creating. So I just think you are good enough to be doing professional illustrations but that would never mean you "should".

Lana Gramlich said...

Freebird makes a wonderful point!