Sunday, January 17, 2010

Learning Turkish










Here


Whoops, that's Kurdish,
but the singer is Kurdish-Turkish.


22 comments:

Dr. Monkey Von Monkerstein said...

Bravo to you for learning a new language. I'm still trying to master English.

The Artist Within Us said...

Greetings to you Caroline,

Your drawings are beautiful as ever and I need to let you in on a little secrete. Just this Friday I discovers a Turkish world atlas and quickly made sure it would be mine, even though I have already two other ones.

So when I saw your posting I was contemplating on what the odds were that this country would come up between us and our many followers.

Wishing you a wonderful start to the week,
Egmont

Anonymous said...

wonderful post!!!
I am Turkish

Lawendula said...

I love the fishes! :)
Turkish is such a strange language. When living in Berlin, I heard it all the time.
"Ane"- "Mama" is strange, because all nations in Europe more or less say Mama, Mummy or Mamman..., but Ane?
What I really love about Berlin are Turkish Groceries. You can get so much fresh vegetable and the most wonderful sheep cheese there for very small money and they always give you something extra.

Jacky said...

I am enchanted by Turkey also ...would love to visit one day. The textiles, the buildings, the food, a wonderful culture.
Love your fishies - one fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish?

Jacky xox

Crayons said...

Yes! You got it, Jacky.

Margaret Benbow said...

I love the way a new language infuses words, images and ideas with freshness--a blood transfusion of the mind and heart! We see them new, like Eve.

Studio Sylvia said...

I don't have a particularly good ear for languages so I admire your efforts and determination. A terrific activity for 2010.

Lana Gramlich said...

Congratulations & thank you. Now I can read the cover of a favorite childhood book, anyway. ;) Like you, there's something about Turkish culture that really draws me in--the architecture, the art. There are too many things in the world to enjoy & just not enough time...
I was learning Welsh some years ago, but there's just NO ONE to speak it with (& no access to books, really,) so I must admit, I've slacked off. Occasionally I practice counting to ten, though. At least I can keep that.

Marianne said...

CB - I really appreciated your COLORFUL drawings! They bring life and light to a grey week of rain.

Kirstin said...

Wonderful drawings. How fun that you are learning a new language.

Deborah Carr said...

Can you say Turkish Figs?

Have missed your art while I was away. It's nice to be back and catching up.

Fancy Fodder said...

You're always doing something amazing!
Never stop your wonderment with the world around you near, AND far.
xoxoxo
Franny
P.s.
I love the music video...it makes me want to get up and dance!
The costumes are gorgeous :+D

Stark Raving Zen said...

Wonderful! This is so lovely! My favorite is the drawing of the little kedi. :)

~*~Patty Szymkowicz said...

Hello Caroline ~ I am visiting from Pat at Ooglebloop's

Your drawings are wonderful and how exciting to learn a new language, it's a very good brain massage :)
I enjoyed the YouTube singing and dancing very much !
oxo
my word verification is: immul, that almost sounds Turkish ;)

Sarah said...

Found your wonderful blog through Jamie..how fun are you!! I just love your style...loove it! Your sense of humor is wonderful! I look forward to coming back to visit often! Namasate, Sarah

coolwaterworks said...

Wow! I envy you Caroline... :)
I always wanted to learn a new foreign language, so I tried learning Italian a few months ago... But I was not able to pursue it... :(

Perhaps it is quite difficult for a multilingual person to add another language to his tongue (as most Filipinos can speak 2 Philippine dialects, our national language and English)....

Btw, I love the art from your archives... :)

T.R. said...

Ahhhh - you transported me back to my favorite city in the world - Istanbul. What a beautiful post. That culture is one of the most unique and fascinating in the world. I am mesmerized by the people, the language, the culture. Here kedi, kedi.

bobbie said...

Marvelous! And I loved the video.

karin said...

My son, Jake, and his Russian wife, Lucia, and their ten year old son Eldar who already speaks English, Russian and Hungarian, have just moved to Fetiye in Turkey for nine months from Budapest. Lucia has already been studying Turkish and is teaching Jake and Eldar. Jake says Eldar is quicker but he, Jake, is more serious! I shall tell Jake to look at your post.

ooglebloops said...

This post would make a wonderful children's book - ever consider that?

Enjoyed your progression post also - !

Merisi said...

Wonderful world of language, congratulations on studying a beloved culture's language! As they say, the language is like a passport, it takes you places you'd not be able to without.

Have you been to Ruşen Ergün's beautiful blog? Her pictures make me want to travel to her hometown of Gallipoli immediately!