Friday, August 1, 2008

Senbazuru











Senbazuru is a string of 1,000 origami cranes. A Japanese tradition holds that anyone who folds a thousand origami cranes will be granted a wish, such as long life or recovery from illness or injury. In modern times, the crane also symbolizes peace.

Since Hiroshima, senbazuru has become associated with the story of Sadako Sasaki, a girl who contracted leukemia as a result of radiation from the American atomic bombing of Hiroshima.

Here are directions to make a crane. Mine are always terribly lumpy and lop-sided, but I don't think my mom would mind.

25 comments:

Dr. Monkey Von Monkerstein said...

Brilliant post. And I love the young you. Aw heck I love you now you too.

GreenishLady said...

I have a little packet of origami paper. Maybe I will try making some cranes this weekend. I love your memory of your Mom. I lost my Mom 3 weeks ago. I think they'd have liked one another.

Another beautiful post. These really, really delight me so much!

Susan M Hinckley said...

I love your stories and am so glad I happened upon your blog. I hope you will write a graphic novel -- I just read a brilliant one (Robot Dreams - Sara Varon) I'm a self-taught artist as well who was thwarted by my middle school art teachers until I finally overcame my fears at about age 30 and now am enjoying a nice art career. Someone should do something about those middle school art teachers. Imagine what the world is missing out on as a result of their "teaching"! I look forward to seeing all of your stories. Thanks for sharing them.

Lana Gramlich said...

This is such a wonderful post, hon. I'm all choked up (& I'm at work!) I really like the square of your mom sitting on that big ol' peace sign. That's so sweet.
Thanks for the instructions for the origami crane! I'm going to give it a shot this weekend.

Shopgirl said...

There are no words, this is a wonderful way to share a event that alot have forgotten. I love the VW....heck, I love it all, you have a special way of getting the message out. I will be back, Hugs Mary. In 1969 my second son Cory was born...the news was all bad, I wasn't even excited about the walk on the moon. I could only think that we were fighting a war, the Moon could come later.
Hope you are having a good summer.....here I am again thinking about a war, and they are still talking about the moon. It is beautiful to look at, could we just leave it alone.
This turned into a book...TEE-HEE

Café Chick said...

I struggle with making paper cranes, too ... but by the time I've done a few, I end up with some that slightly resemble the finished product and somehow feel proud of myself. :-)
I love your blog.

bobbie said...

This is a lovely post. Your drawings never cease to amaze me. A very nice memorial for your mom, and certainly for the victims of Hiroshima.
I'm going to try to follow the directions and make cranes today.
You were a very cute 4th grader.

Sacred Suzie said...

What a beautiful story about your past, your relationship with your Mom and her passions for non-violent activism. I remember learning how to make those cranes at camp. My old doctor's office had a mobile of many miniature ones, I had no idea that they were inspired for peace like that.

I wish I could remember moon shoes. They sound like something I would like.

EMBELLISHER said...

What a beautiful ritual making the little origami crane for you mom and for all those who died as a consequence of Hiroshima. I'm going to try my hand at making a couple.Beautiful post Caroline.

Suzy said...

Did you also take Space Food Sticks to snack on?

SUsan M. Hinckley -- I hear you loud and clear about middle school art teachers! It happened to me and it happened to my daughters. I have yet to recover.

laughingwolf said...

excellent memorials, thank you :)

Tammy said...

I have a wee peace crane that a long ago blog friend sent to me...it sits beside an angel with one wing, also a gift from that same blogger.
Blogging can be wonderful, especially when we find inspirational blogs such as yours!
I found you through my very first issue of Artful Blogging. The magazine is awesome and so is your blog!♥

Mary said...

Nice, very meaningful memories that speak of your respect for your Mom. I have never made a paper crane, but I'll try!

In 1969 I was entering high school. Those 60's were rough years. Peace!

amaccash said...

Found your blog thru the Artful Blogging mag. Contgragulations! I'm newly fascinated by the blog concept, spending lots of time just looking so far at all the eye candy. Your naration make the everyday interesting and your artwork is so well crafted. Thanks for sharing.

mrsb said...

Such a heartfelt post and beautiful illustrations. Thank you for sharing.

Ginnie said...

In 1945 I was a very impressionable 12year old. I remember the shock that I felt when I realized all those people had been killed or maimed. I had nightmares for a long time.
I think your Mom must have been a very special person, as are you, Caroline.

Melba said...

This post moved me. I loved seeing you as a child. beautiful.

MojoMan said...

Tomorrow is August 6th. I'll be thinking of a horrible day not so very long ago and about this beautiful post.

Balisha said...

It's wonderful to have these memories saved in this post. I loved remembering with you. I will try to make a crane.My kids are near your age...I would have enjoyed knowing your Mom.

Barbara Anne said...

Hi Caroline!

I just linked to your blog and have read all the way to the bottom (no archived posts yet) because this one touched me so. Your illustrations are delightful and your messages so insightful - even the clue about when to leave the pool!

As for middle school art teachers - Thanks Miss Kessler of Elmhurst!!!!!! You let us fly!!!!!!!

We have a '69 VW bus and a paper crane on our Christmas tree.

Peace!

freebird said...

Wonderful post. I love it that you have that special connection with your mother. I use my mother's rolling pin for my connection. I didn't let my son have toy guns - he made his own out of sticks and whatever he could find but is now a vegan surfer and almost a teacher (at 35). I was a junior in high school for the better part of that '69. Our flag flew at half staff too many times.
I had a friend when I lived in Japan. She died of leukemia a few months after I left. Why arent' all the nukes destroyed yet?

Selma said...

Caroline, I am so incredibly touched by this. The story of the cranes is magical. I am so sorry for the loss of your Mum but what a wonderful way to remember her.

Tine said...

beautiful post!

nina said...

That's a lovely tribute to your childhood and memories of your mom.
Yes, I think she would be very happy to see your accomplishment--in not only a crane, but all you do here.

dguzman said...

This post is wonderful. Thanks.